Availity news center

News Center

Prior to the introduction of the electronic health record CMS (Medicare) and other health plan administrators relied upon claims data. Now the mandate of meaningful use has made clinical data available via the electronic health record. Physicians disparage the EHR because of its disruption of the clinical encounter and inefficiency in data entry. Few would deny the enormous data collection which has taken place.

As you are likely aware by now, CMS’ final rule on Emergency Preparedness Requirements for Medicare and Medicaid Providers and Suppliers went into effect on November 15, 2016 and will be implemented on November 15, 2017. This final rule establishes national emergency preparedness requirements for Medicare and Medicaid participating providers and suppliers to plan adequately for both natural and man-made disasters and coordinate with federal, state, tribal, regional, and local emergency preparedness systems.

Availity, the nation’s largest real-time health information network, announced today that it has received a significant growth equity investment led by Francisco Partners, a leading technology-focused private equity firm, with additional investment from Availity’s existing investor group.

Availity today announced its recognition as one of the Achievers 50 Most Engaged Workplaces™ in North America. The annual award, issued by Achievers, an industry leading provider of employee recognition and engagement solutions, commends top employers that display leadership and innovation in engaging their workforces.

Administrative costs make up about 15% of all healthcare expenditures—well over $300 billion annually, according to the 2016 index report from the California Association for Healthcare Quality. Outdated, manual processes and rejected claims eat up a large portion of this cost. The key to reducing administrative costs lies in refining these processes and changing with the times, according to industry leaders. Here are five strategies to consider implementing at your organization.

Payers and providers have for decades stayed in their silos, leading to a more fractured and adversarial healthcare system. That relationship, however, is starting to soften for many in the industry. Payer-provider partnerships put the two groups on the same team in hopes of reducing costs and improving care and outcomes through sharing data and better communication.

Availity, LLC, the nation’s largest payer and provider engagement network, today announced it has closed a five year $200 million senior secured revolving credit facility. The facility includes an accordion feature which allows for an additional $100 million of capacity when exercised. The revolver will be largely undrawn at close.

Although collaboration between payers and providers will be critical if they are to succeed in transitioning to value-based payment models, they continue to struggle with information exchange in the current fee-for-service environment. That’s the finding of a new survey of 40 health plans and more than 400 practice- and facility-based providers, which found significant communication gaps between the stakeholder groups.

Online and multi-payer portals are viewed as promising solutions to improve communications between payers and providers while also mitigating costs, yet these tools are underutilized. While 60 percent of payers prefer the use of online portals as the primary means of communication with providers, it seems providers are less enthusiastic, as only 39 percent of practice-based providers and 40 percent of facility-based providers strongly support online portals as a primary source, according to a survey by Availity.

A survey conducted by Availity, the nation’s largest real-time health information network, found that while payers and providers want to collaborate more closely on value-based care initiatives, such partnerships remain vulnerable to poor data transparency, competing business goals, and significant administrative burdens.