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News Center

A myriad of factors stand in the way of health care organizations using data analytics to boost reimbursement. As hospitals transition to a value-based reimbursement model, data analytics may play a leading role. However, with an overwhelming wealth of information being generated each day, key decisions must be made to ensure the captured data are truly of benefit.

In a time of healthcare consumerism and high-deductible health plans, the patient has become a major revenue source for healthcare organizations. But without strong point-of-service patient collection strategies, providers could be seeing their payments walk right out the door with their patients.

Health plans have long supplied their members with provider directories to assist in finding in-network physicians who are accepting new patients. But what should be a helpful aid often isn't, due to outdated or just plain wrong data. Not only is this frustrating for patients trying to find an available provider, it can cost them more than they anticipated if they end up incurring out-of-network fees for a physician they thought was in-network.

A tiny change to how a small hospital uses technology is resulting in big savings of between $3,000 and $10,000 a month. Iroquois Memorial Hospital, a 25-bed facility in the eastern Illinois town of Watseka faced a problem.

As patient financial responsibility continues to increase in a more consumer-focused healthcare environment, more hospitals are shifting healthcare revenue cycle management strategies to improve patient collections. Iroquois Memorial Hospital in Illinois is one of these healthcare organizations.

“Give the lady what she wants,” was the mantra of Marshall Field, the 19th century retail titan whose eponymous Chicago department store was world-renown for delivering outstanding customer experiences (CX). Today, digital communication and service technology have opened a world of endlessly creative possibilities for CX built on many of the same innovations that Field pioneered 150 years ago, including identifying consumer preferences and offering transparent and consistent pricing.

The public is being primed to take on more financial responsibility for their healthcare costs, with unprecedentedly high deductibles and co-insurance among the most notable drivers. It’s expected that even more employers will offer these high-deductible plans in 2016, compelling employees to pay for an even larger portion of their healthcare services. That is, if they schedule them at all.

Under pressure from federal and state regulators to improve the timeliness and accuracy of provider directories, health insurers are looking to software vendors for answers. In this article from Health Data Management, Availity CEO, Russ Thomas, explains how Availity is working with America’s Health Insurance Plans to address inaccurate provider data with their Provider Data Management solution.

Many physicians’ offices and hospitals struggle with legacy EHRs that lack the improved functionality of their more technologically advanced iterations. Most of these legacy systems don’t integrate well with third-party applications, and many are built as silos not capable of communicating with other systems.